My kind of Magic: The Gathering card.

My kind of Magic: The Gathering card.

OpenNews: Announcing Source Jobs

As journalism continues to break new ground on the web, news organizations large and small are hiring developers, designers, and others who bring new skills and ideas to journalism. Growing the community of talented developers working in news is one of the things we try to do at OpenNews. Our Fellowship program, our sponsorship of hack days, our website Source—it’s all part of trying to build the community of folks coding in news. Today we’re taking a very direct path to that: We’re launching a new section on Source that will list the latest journalism-code jobs.

Source is designed (from the database up) around the people building journalism on the web. Jobs is a natural compliment to the project breakdowns, behind-the-scenes articles, Q&As, and learning pieces that we feature on Source: you can learn how it’s done, and then you can go and do it in some of the best newsrooms around the world.

The listings are lightweight: a one-sentence job descriptions and a link to the full listing on an external site. They’re also self-serve. Today we’ve also opened up an organizational backend on Source so news orgs can list their own jobs. Erin Kissane explains how to get the keys to your organization page on the official announcement.

This is an exciting time for journalism and an exciting time to code in news. We’re thrilled to be able to play a small part in helping to bring talent into newsrooms. And we can’t wait to see the code all these new jobs produce!

Source Jobs is the first of many new features to come on Source, all possible thanks to our renewed grant that puts additional emphasis on community building and Source in particular. Expect much more to come soon—including dates and a location for the SRCCON conference, which we’ll be announcing at the NICAR conference next week.

babygoatsandfriends:

Rolling Meadows Orchard and Farm
babygoatsandfriends:

Golden Polish Hen by Newleaf on Flickr.Disappointed in you.

babygoatsandfriends:

Golden Polish Hen by Newleaf on Flickr.

Disappointed in you.

OpenNews: Kicking 2014 Off Early

2013 was an incredible year for OpenNews. Our Knight-Mozilla Fellows did fantastic work; Source continued to grow as a hub for the incredible work done by the news nerd community; we helped to sponsor more than 50 news hack days around the world, and much much more. But 2013 is almost over and, in these waning days of it, I wanted to tell you about some amazing stuff that’s happening right out of the gate in 2014:

Surprise Sixth Fellow!

When we announced our 2014 Fellows at the Mozilla Festival in London this year, our friends at the Knight Foundation approached us about adding a sixth fellow, to be hosted by the team doing great work at the Washington Post. We jumped at the opportunity, in part because we received so many stunning applicants for our original fellowship search we were excited to revisit the list and find someone amazing to work with. And today, I’m thrilled to announce our sixth 2014 fellow:

Ben Chartoff designs and creates data visualizations. He is committed to building data literacy and numeracy through viscerally clear and compelling visuals. At the Sunlight Foundation in Washington, DC, Ben worked to demonstrate the value of open government and open data as essential elements in a democracy. He has a background in both the arts and sciences, and strives to bring both beauty and rigor to every project. He is passionate about most things, including food and backpacking.

Ben will be joining our five other fantastic 2014 Knight-Mozilla Fellows at our Fellowship Onboarding event in San Francisco in mid-January. We’re so excited!

We’re growing in 2014!

One of the most exciting aspects of our new grant is the ability to add some staff to OpenNews. And today I’m so excited to announce that in 2014, Erin Kissane will be joining us as Director of Content and Ryan Pitts will be joining us as Director of Code. We’ve been lucky enough to work with Erin and Ryan extensively on the Source project, but starting in 2014 (Erin immediately, Ryan a little later in the year), they’ll be joining as full-time partners in OpenNews. We’re *thrilled* to have them on board and excited about what that’ll mean for everything we can accomplish together.

And much more to come

In early December, Erin, Ryan, Erika Owens, Kio Stark, and myself got together in New York City for two days of building a calendar and a plan for 2014. There is so much to come this year, from SRCCON (our maker-heavy Source conference for the journalism-code community) mid-year, to two Code Convenings that will bring news developers together to open-source code, to learning and hacking events around the world, and much, much more. 2014 is going to be an incredible year.

Here’s a quick look at our whiteboarded calendar, with much much more to come:

Get ready for maximum OpenNews ass-kickery in 2014!

atlasobscura:

Moon model at the Chicago Field Museum prepared by Johann Friedrich Julius Schmidt in Germany (1898).

atlasobscura:

Moon model at the Chicago Field Museum prepared by Johann Friedrich Julius Schmidt in Germany (1898).

(via kenyatta)

99percentinvisible:

If you tune around on a Shortwave radio, you might hear someone reciting a series of numbers. Like in this example collected by The Conet Project. Find out the mystery of these radio frequencies in Episode 97: Number Stations. 

babygoatsandfriends:

MAJOR CUTE ALERT 
BABY GOAT IN SWEATER
BEING FRIENDS WITH GIANT HORSE
via Goat lover, and proud of it

babygoatsandfriends:

MAJOR CUTE ALERT 

BABY GOAT IN SWEATER

BEING FRIENDS WITH GIANT HORSE

via Goat lover, and proud of it

dangrzeca:

If you a hear a chorus of MEOWS singing the Imperial March, it’s this freshly printed batch of CAT-AT tees marching over to my booth at the @renegadecraft in Chicago this weekend! Printed with Dark Hoth Gray on Silver tees!! #starwars (at Ground Up Press)

dangrzeca:

If you a hear a chorus of MEOWS singing the Imperial March, it’s this freshly printed batch of CAT-AT tees marching over to my booth at the @renegadecraft in Chicago this weekend! Printed with Dark Hoth Gray on Silver tees!! #starwars (at Ground Up Press)

(Source: jetsah)

Thankful for Tacos

Thankful for Tacos

calumet412:

In-flight passenger lounge, 1974, United Airlines, Chicago.
Chicago Tribune Archives

calumet412:

In-flight passenger lounge, 1974, United Airlines, Chicago.

Chicago Tribune Archives

veltman:

Last month I co-led a “Web Developer Literacy” for reporters and editors at the Online News Association conference. I expected a lot of questions about particular technologies, but the discussion wound up focusing much more on process and office politics, touching on tough questions like:

How do you integrate developers into a team of reporters?
How do you spec out digital projects when you have no idea what’s feasible?
How can developers, designers, and reporters work together effectively in the crucible of a newsroom?

(via journo-geekery)

Last night, while enjoying some steak, sweet potato and apple tacos, I decided to create a github repo dedicated to community-driven taco creation. Just over 12 hours later, it’s had 103 commits, 17 contributors, and a ton of delicious recipes. Love tacos? SUBMIT YOURS TOO.

Tags: tacos

calumet412:

In the days before Big Jim Colosimo, Al Capone, the Syndicate and the Outfit, organized crime in Chicago was known as The Black Hand.

Mostly run by recent Italian immigrants, The Black Hand specialized in extortion.

Extortion letters were often written phonetically or with only symbols.

To receive a letter with a black hand symbol would mean, without complying, certain death.

The interesting point here is that the two typed letters shown were written by a Polish gang member to appear as if they had been written by an Italian - complete with accent.

via archives.gov

OpenNews: Meet our 2014 Knight-Mozilla Fellows

265 applicants. When our search for our 2014 Knight-Mozilla Fellowships ended at midnight, August 17, that’s what we were staring at: 265 of some of the most talented developers, hackers, data scientists, and makers I’d ever come across. The number of slots we had for them? Five.

The process to narrow from 265 to five wasn’t easy—at every step in the process we’d have a gut check, constantly revising our narrowed lists upward to make sure we didn’t miss anyone amazing. By the time we’d winnowed the lists down to an impossibly small 25 candidates, our news partners—the New York Times, ProPublica, the Texas Tribune, La Nacion, Ushahidi and Internews Kenya—all asked the same question: Can we choose them all?

But, together, we narrowed down to a final five.

These five Fellows come at a turning point for the Knight-Mozilla OpenNews project as well. As I announced last week, OpenNews will be continuing not just for 2014, but for 2015 and 2016 as well, supported by a substantial grant from the Knight Foundation. This grant allows us to expand far beyond fellowships: we’ll be hosting our own conference, SRC CON; we’ll be holding “code convenings” to build collaborative newsroom code; we’ll be supporting hack days around the world and bringing learning opportunities to smaller newsrooms. But we will always see our Knight-Mozilla Fellows as the beating heart inside OpenNews: a chance to invest deeply in talent and ideas and new blood for a growing community.

2014 marks our third cohort of Knight-Mozilla Fellows, and the five fellows I’m announcing today have their work cut out for them to match the incredible ideas, projects, and people that came before them.

That said, they’re going to blow it all away. Our new fellows are amazing and I am so excited for you to meet them. We started at 265 and now we have five—meet our 2014 Knight-Mozilla Fellows:

Harlo Holmes | New York Times

Harlo Holmes is a media scholar, software programmer, and activist. As research fellow with The Guardian Project, she primarily investigates topics in digital media steganography, metadata, and the standards surrounding technology in the social sciences. She harnesses her multi-faceted background in service of responding to the growing technological needs of human rights workers, journalists, and other do-gooders around the world. Follow her @harlo or at harloholm.es

Brian Jacobs | ProPublica

Brian Jacobs is a designer and interactive developer. He’s passionate about multi-faceted visual tools that are civic-minded, scientific, journalistic, or otherwise educational, to benefit the people and their habitat. He’s worked in commercial and academic contexts, on GIS projects in West Virginia, web apps in Philadelphia, and towards an urban data processing and visualization platform for the MIT SENSEable City Lab, in Singapore. He’s excited about the future of open data, particularly collaborative and semantic web initiatives that can afford reproducible access to cleaner, more interdisciplinary data. Brian is also intensely interested in bagels, hikes, and sci-fi camp. Follow him @btjakes.

Aurelia Moser | Ushahidi / Internews Kenya

Aurelia Moser is a data munger and code monkey based in New York City. With a background in library metadata and lab work, she builds visualizations and narratives around data, supported dually by passions for data preservation and open information. Equal part experimenter and educator, she organizes NYC Nodebots meetups and coordinates curricula for Girl Develop It, a non-profit teaching women how to code in low-cost classes. For fun, she runs a radio show based on the semantic web, and digs studying, silent discos, and shoegaze. Follow her @auremose or at algorhyth.ms.

Gabriela Rodriguez | La Nacion

Gabriela Rodriguez is an activist and hacker who loves the intersection between media and technology. She grew up in Uruguay and now lives in Portland, OR (USA). She is a software developer with passion for free software and open knowledge. She co-founded the Uruguayan nonprofit DATA that works with open data and transparency in South America. Follow her @gaba.

Marcos Vanetta | Texas Tribune

Marcos Vanetta is a biomedical engineer truly passionate about software and technology. He is an experienced web developer and an open source enthusiast. Marcos is an active member of the Hacks/Hackers community in Buenos Aires and the lead developer of Mapa76 (aka Analice.me). You can find him in a rock & roll concert or at your closest hackathon. Follow him @malev or at malev.com.ar.

All five fellows will be with us in London this weekend for the Mozilla Festival. If you’re there, do seek them out, say hello, and find out more about them. And, if you’re at MozFest, be sure to track me down and say hi as well.